Browsing Category: Teaching

A Hopeful Church

Not your typical heaven and hell outcome. Because of HIM, because of His Grace, we can all live again because He loves us so dearly and so deeply. #hallelujah

The more I become an adult, the more I begin to understand the doctrine of my church more and more. Being a teacher, and now being a mother, has opened up my eyes and allowed me to glimpse at what it must be like for our loving Heavenly Father. And, the more and more I feel for Him, but the more and more I am so grateful for such a hopeful church.

I have been Mormon all my life, as you know. Throughout my life, I have heard from friends, Internet, articles, history, school, literature, etc. of heaven vs. hell. I have read and heard of ministers preaching brimstone and fire. I have seen and learned of religious men and women who have the fearterror (not the fear-respect) of God. I have felt for my friends and characters who mourn lost ones who failed to join their religion because they believe they won’t end in heaven.

What a relief for me in what I and my religion believes. We have a more hopeful outlook in the afterlife.

Not your typical heaven and hell outcome. Because of HIM, because of His Grace, we can all live again because He loves us so dearly and so deeply. #hallelujah

Christ died so that we may live. Through His Atonement, He gave the greatest gift to mankind–GRACE and the hope of eternal life. In the LDS Church, we believe that after the say all and end all, after the end of the world, the Millennium, the Judgement, and the ultimate success and triumph of Christ and Heavenly Father over Satan, there is a wonderful plan for us. (Click here to read more about the Mormon view of the afterlife and the 3 degrees of heaven.) We don’t believe in “heaven” and “hell” in a traditional sense. But, we do believe in 3 kingdoms of glory. The highest is where God and Christ have domain and where the most righteous of His followers will live forever after. Then, two lower degrees, both of which are still better than any life known here on Earth. Even the sinner, the murderers, the bad guys have a chance to repent and accept Christ as their Savior and the only Way in the after life.

This is because if we mess up, if we sin, and of course we will-we are mortal men, we have the opportunity to repent and to receive His grace and forgiveness. There is no limit to the amount of times we can repent and use His Grace. How hopeful is that!?!

God is our loving Father. We truly believe that He is our literal father and we are His literal children. Because of this, He cares so deeply for us. He is not truly a vengeful God. Yes, the Old Testament describes Him as such, but do you really think that God would change between the Old Testament and the New Testament? God does not change. But, our understanding of Him does. He knew that we would fail constantly to our carnal and mortal weaknesses, and because He loved us so much, He sent His only Begotten Son, Christ, to atone for us. God loves us as children because we ARE His children. Therefore, although He may be very, very exasperated at us, He still loves us and desperately wants us to succeed and return to Him.

I am coming to understand this more and more with each passing year. Being a teacher to junior high students really opened my eyes to this characteristic of a long-suffering, disappointed, but still ever-loving God. Teaching is all I ever wanted to do when I grew up. It was (and still is) my passion in life. I immediately formed a loving, caring bond for each and every one of my students. My goal was to help them succeed. And, as a teacher, after getting to know them and see their work, I could tell what their potential was. I knew what their abilities were. I knew what they were capable of achieving. Of course, God knows that about all of us–He created us!

But, alas. I taught 12-14 year old kids. Of course many of them didn’t care about school work. Of course many of them weren’t living up to their potential or ability. It exasperated me. I wanted so badly for them to succeed because 1) I knew they could, 2) I knew it would relieve them and make them happier. I would tell my students that I knew they could do better. I told them how much I wanted them to succeed. I explained to them that I didn’t like their current grades, it twisted my stomach. But, that their current grades going home on report cards should be a lesson. Tomorrow was a fresh start. Tomorrow they could try again. Tomorrow we could forget about yesterday’s failed test or forgotten homework, or misbehavior. Tomorrow we could and would do better. Many times, I’d give them a second chance–I’d extend deadlines, I’d allow them to correct tests for points back. I would always plead with them to take the opportunities I was giving them. However, I never forced them. It was their decision. They already knew what was expected, and they had their agency. Many never did, even though in class they would promise to do better, they would promise to submit a paper, promise to do corrections, promise to get a parent signature. A few did, a few would apologize even though they did everything I ever asked and more. I knew there were some who really did struggle but always went above and beyond in their effort. Those were the few that I really cherished. I used them as examples. I wanted them to help lift up and encourage their peers. There were times I’d be very passionate in my lectures about wanting them to do better, about their potential, about giving them second chances. Many times I would warn it was the last time I was going to give them this opportunity. But, I’d still offer it on other assignments. It hurt when they didn’t try, but I never gave up being hopeful.

Can you see how I believe I am beginning to understand my Father in Heaven better? He has given us all agency. He has given us all commandments and expectations. Sometimes we fall short. He asks us to repent and to change. We promise to do better. But, then fall short again. He admonishes us to do better and forgives us again. We promise to do better and then fail again. He warns us to repent and change. We do…for a short amount of time. But, I cannot emphasize enough the amount that He loves us. He loves us so much that He has already given us the knowledge that He will triumph. That we have a hopeful future. That we can always ask forgiveness, receive Grace, and try again and become better. That we will be with Him afterwards.

What a hopeful church I belong to!

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Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Golden Vlog // November

November 2015 Golden Vlog is all about jobs!

I believe that working and holding a job is very important, not only for money, but also for experience and teaching. That’s why I’m so excited that today’s Golden Vlog prompt is on jobs and working!

November 2015 Golden Vlog is all about jobs!

 

Life w/ Mrs G & the ArtistWhat was your first job? Your current job? What have you liked/disliked about your jobs?

Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Teaching’s #1 Virtue: Patience

Although I’m not teaching anymore, I still think about it periodically. I mean, you can take the teacher out of the classroom, but you can’t take the teacher out of the soul. And, it doesn’t help that I’ve been subbing on and off this month.

I’ve mentioned before that my favorite time during the school year has been the first term. For the most part, students are just as excited and enthusiastic as the teachers. Teachers are happy, have creative new lesson plans prepared, and students willingly participate and do homework. But, around this time–late October and early November, the first term ends…and, metaphorically, so does the “honeymoon stage” of the new school year.

And patience becomes hard. Like, sometimes impossibly hard. But it is needed. And, it’s always something that I’ve felt I was weak at.

I do thoroughly and whole-heartedly believe that teaching (no matter what kind of setting) was my God-given calling. But, not only does God use your talents for His good, he also uses those situations to teach you as well. And, boy did I learn a lot about His grace and patience while teaching.

This is the biggest lesson I learned during my 3 years of teaching:

Teaching is learning, using, forgetting, losing, repenting for patience every day and always finding it again.

Just as I told my students that each day was a new day, a day to be better behaved, a day to earn a better grade, a day to be more humble, a day to be more responsible, a day to be happier, it was a new day each day for me as well. If I had lost my patience (and sometimes, my cool) with my students, the next day was a new day, a new beginning, and always started with a smile on my face, and love for my students emanating from me. I spent numerous evenings and mornings on my knees asking Heavenly Father for more patience and forgiveness for my impatient behavior.

Being patient with students not only helps my attitude, but it also helps their attitude. The classroom becomes a safe environment, and one of willingness to work together. It harbors a better learning mentality and allows us all to make good memories.

I guess I still haven’t learned as much about patience as He would have liked me to, because He loves to use Rhys to help teach me patience still. It has always been one of my weaknesses, and I will always try to live up to His expectations on patience.

When or how do you use patience in your career?
 
Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Project Read Your Classroom Shelves #4

Project Read Your Classroom Shelves #4: Castle of Llyr, Rules of the Road

I have been reading so many other books this past month, that I haven’t made a big dent in my YA novels. So, I only have two reviews for today’s Project Read Your Classroom Shelves!

Project Read Your Classroom Shelves #4: Castle of Llyr, Rules of the Road

The Castle of Llyr by Lloyd Alexander

Via

I had originally bought this book at a library $1 sale and immediately grabbed it when I saw two obvious Welsh words: “Lloyd” and “Llyr.” I thought it’d be cool to have a Welsh magic and knights story. Well, it turns out that this is the third installment in the Chronicles of Prydain, the most famous of which is the second: The Black Cauldron. After realizing that, names and events fell into place as Disney made a version of The Black Cauldron.

This book is the developing/discovering of the love between Assistant Pig-Keeper turned knight Taran and the tom boyish princess with magical properties Eilonwy. Eilonwy is sent to Dinas Rhydant to learn how to become a Lady and to be betrothed to the clumsy Prince Rhun. But, Magg, the steward of the castle captures Eilonwy and takes her to the evil witch, Achren. So, Taran, Kaw, Gurgi, Flewddur, and Gwydion embark on a quest to rescue her as Taran realized his deeper feelings towards Eilonwy.

It was a fun read, but some characters’ relationships as well as allured events were a bit confusing because it is the third installment in the series. But I had so much fun pronouncing the Welsh names and places correctly and learning more about the epic tale of Welsh lore.

Rules of the Road by Joan Bauer

Teenage Jenny just got her license. She works in a shoe store and knows everything about shoes. Her dad is an alcoholic and has left her family (which includes her mom and younger sister). Jenny gets an opportunity of a lifetime during summer break to be the driver of Gladstone Shoe’s owner (this is a national chain!) to take her from Chicago to Texas for a future-deciding stock holder’s meeting.
This book has an interesting premise: comparing the rules of the road to the rules of life. However, I think the author tries to do too much in addition to being almost existential in life rules: 1) teenage girl saves cooperate business, 2) driving rules and experiences, 3) dealing with a drunk father, 4) teenage girl taking care of family, 5) ins and outs of the shoe business. It was just too busy.
But, the characters are likeable and fleshed out, except for the antagonist. He seemed pretty ambiguous and two-dimensional to me. But, I really did like the resolution…not with the main cooperate saving plot, but with dealing with her denying alcoholic father. That was great.
Which of these books seem interesting to you?
Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

5 Tips for Having Toddlers Do Chores

I grew up doing chores every Saturday. As far back as I can remember, I was responsible for my own space and mess. Because of this, I felt very prepared and independent when I left for college (unlike many girls I knew who didn’t know how to load a dishwasher, do laundry, or even clean a sink and mirror!). I was grateful for this, and it helped influence what kind of mother I wanted to be. I always knew I’d have my children do chores throughout the week, but I didn’t know when to start training them.

Well, Rhys decided he wanted to start his chore training a few months ago. I typically scrub the house every Friday, and he would follow me around, wanting to “play the games” Momma was “playing.” So, he’d “sweep”, “help” with laundry, and explore the dishwasher. I decided to help him learn how to do some chores “properly.”

As of today, Rhys helps me sweep and swiffer the floors, empty the dishwasher, pick up his toys, throw away his diapers, do some scrubbing, and do the laundry. Of course, he is only 15 months old, and can’t do any of these by himself, nor properly, but he is learning the concept. And that is the important part. It is helping him learn what is part of the family’s routine, learn responsibility, and gain confidence in his own abilities.

I’ve decided to share a few of my tips on how to have your toddler help you with chores.

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Even 1 year olds can help do chores. These tips will help you to instill good habits in your children!

 

Repeat, Repeat, Repeat

One of the best basic ways of learning is repetition and direct instruction. Be consistent in how you do your chores and when to be responsible. For instance, we always wipe the table and sweep the floor after each meal. Now, Rhys immediately goes to the broom closet when I take him down from his high chair.
Guide them, if need be. Show them, then help them, then ask them to show you. Be patient until they get the concept.

Make it a Game

Make chores fun. Do it with your toddler, with a smile and a positive attitude. Play some kid or Disney songs and dance while you clean. Get them their own play equipment, for example, for sweeping, buy them a little play broom, If your toddler gets distracted, don’t force them to continue the chore–they are only toddlers, after all!

Parental Supervision

Again, these are toddlers! Supervise them! Give them age appropriate jobs and don’t let them touch harsh chemicals. Yes, Rhys “scrubs” the toilet, but he never touches the scrubbing part of the brush, nor the toilet water. When I Windex the mirrors, I have Rhys wipe a different mirror with no Windex on it–that way, he is stilling learning the how without me having to worry about the chemicals.

Have Patience and Be Flexible

Sometimes, Rhys’s “help” is counter-productive. Be patient with them. If a chore takes longer than normal, it is ok. You are teaching, not just doing it yourself. Take breaks. It takes me about 2.5-3 hours for me to completely finish all our scrubbing and chores, but I have to do it in two increments, so Rhys can have  break. Don’t get frustrated. Just think of this as bonding and learning time, which it is. So, it is ok to go about chores one at a time with some mistakes.

Thank and Praise

No matter how much or how well Rhys helps, I still thank him. If he is taking clothes out of the washer as I am throwing it in, I still tell him thanks for helping. If he pounds the dirt pile with his broom as I try to sweep it up, I praise his effort. It is very important to encourage your child in everything they try to do. This way, they are more willing ot do it. It also shows your love for them.
Do you have your toddlers “help” with chores?
 
Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.