Tag Archives: saint david’s day

Welsh Wednesday | St. David’s Day

Croeso! Welcome back!

Today, Llinos and I will be talking about St. David’s Day….or Dydd Gwyl Dewi. Saint David’s Day is celebrated every year on March 1st.

 

Welsh Wednesdays linkup

Saint David is the patron saint of Wales. He brought back Christianity to the Welsh people after the Roman Christians left Great Britain. He also advised the Welsh to all wear leeks on their lapels as they fought against the invading Saxons and they won.

So, we celebrate much like the Irish celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day…much reveling and wearing green and red. Oh, and we wear “leeks” on our shirts…I have a felt leek pin that I wear. We also wear Welsh clothing…like flags on our shirts!

And, then there is the food! Cornish Pasties and Leek and Potato Soup!

 

Llinos and I have also decided to add in little mini-vlogs. We thought it would be very interesting to have us both speak the same words and phrases to see the differences between a Native North Welshwoman and an American speak Welsh.

Hello/how are you. Smae, Sut dych chi? (shmai shoot-dik-kee)
Happy Birthday Penblwydd hapus (pen-blue-eth happees)
Nice to meet you Braf cwrdd a chi (brav coorth a kee)
I live in…. Dw i’n byw yn Utah (dween be-you in Utah)
It’s a lovely day Mae’n dydd hyfryd (mine deeth huv-red)
My name is…. Tayler dw i (Tayler dwee)

What else would you like to learn about Wales?

 

Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Cornish Pasties

I love Welsh food. It’s so hearty and delicious. Well, this recipe is technically Cornish, but they sell in Wales like crazy! Cornish pasties! This was a very popular meal for the 19th century miners. They could put it in their pocket, take it out and eat a few bites when they were hungry, then put it back in their pocket for later.

I decided to make these for Saint David’s Day as well.

Serves: 4-6 pasties

Ingredients
For the Dough:
– 2 1/4 cup of flour
– dash of salt
– 1 tsp baking powder
– 1/2 cup butter
– 1/2 cup water
milk
For the Filling:
16 oz-20oz stew beef or rump roast
– 1 small russet potato
– 1 carrot
– 1/4 cup peas
– 1/4 onion
– dash of garlic salt/powder

Steps
1) Preheat oven to 450*F.

2) Chop the onion and cut the beef into small pieces and cook them in garlic salt/powder until the meat is thoroughly browned. Then place in a container.

3) Chop the carrot and potato into small pieces and mix in a bowl. Add in the peas. Set aside.

4) For the dough, mix all the ingredients except for the milk.

5) Divide the dough into 4-6 pieces. Roll out the dough into a circle or oval shape.

6) Brush the dough with milk. Place meat and onions and veggie mix on half of the pasty.

7) Fold the dough over and pinch or fold it closed. Brush it with milk. Make two small slits on top to allow steam to escape.

8) Place in oven for about 10 minutes, then reduce temperature to 350* and cook for about 35 minutes or until edges and top are golden-brown.

9) Let them cool for a few minutes, then enjoy this hand food!

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Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Leek and Potato Soup

As Sunday was March 1, Saint David’s Day, I followed Welsh tradition and made some leek and potato soup. In the few past years, I’ve made this for my college roommates, my husband, and my family, and (with the exception of Paige who hates potatoes) love it! So, I thought I’d share the recipe!

Ingredients
3 leeks
5-6 medium-small brown potatoes
3-4 cups chicken stock (based on how thin or creamy you want it)
2 cups heavy cream
thyme
rosemary
garlic powder
butter
6 strips of bacon or 1 can of bacon bits

Steps
1) Boil the potatoes.
2) Cut the leeks–you want to cut where the light green meets the dark green. Cut off the end stub. Wash the stalks, then thinly chop them.

3) Saute the leeks in butter for about 5 minutes on medium-high. Sprinkle garlic powder on it.

4) Pour in the cream and chicken stock and let it simmer on medium for about 10 minutes to soak up the flavor.
5) When the potatoes are finished boiling, peel them, and chop them into cubes.

6) Pour the 2/3 of the potatoes into the soup and sprinkle the rosemary and thyme in. Stir.
7) Now here comes the tricky part. You need an immersion blender to blend this all up to a smooth, creamy soup consistency.  If you don’t, like me, you’ll need to use your normal blender. Only do about 2 cups at a time, or you’re asking for a hot mess all over. So, you’ll also need to transfer it to another pan or pot.
8) Pour the rest of the potatoes chunks in, as well as the bacon (which has been cooked and chopped up). Stir.
9) Enjoy with some fresh rolls!

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Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant Hapus // Happy Saint David’s Day!

Everyone knows about St. Patrick’s Day, the patron saint of Ireland…but did you know he was Welsh? Well, he was! He was a Welsh-born Irish slave. When he was freed, he went to Rome to learn the Gospel. He wanted to return to Wales and bring it with him (there were still some Christians in Wales after the Romans left)…but God visited him saying he had consecrated that land for someone who was to come in 100 years. So, he brought the Gospel back to Ireland (the Roman Christians there were fading back to pagan religions).

One hundred years later, David was born. He performed miracles as a child and even helped the Welsh win a battle by telling them to wear leeks on their shirts to battle so they’d know who was friend and who was foe. Thus, leeks became a symbol of Wales.

Today, March 1st, is Saint David’s Day.

Read here and here for more about Saint David and how I have previously celebrated this holiday.

Today, Rhys and I will be wearing Welsh colors (green, red, white) to church (as well as wearing a felt leek on my shirt). Justin and I are celebrating by making Cornish pasties and leek and potato soup for dinner–both recipes will be on the blog within the next two weeks!

For now, here are some of my favorite pictures from my Welsh study abroad!

Rhaglan Castle
Usk Castle
Skinforth Castle
Cardiff Castle
Cardiff Castle
Cardiff Castle
Caerphilly Castle
Caerphilly Castle
Caerphilly Castle
Castell Coch
Aberystwyth
North Wales
Harlech Castle
Conwy Castle
Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch–no lie! That’s the name of the city!
The top of Mount Snowden
Snowden
Snowden

Isn’t it beautiful? I took over 1000 pictures on my study abroad, and honestly, I wish I had had a DSLR five years ago and took a whole heck of a lot more! I would give anything to go back to Wales!

But, for now, I’ll satisfy my cravings on Welsh food, Welsh songs, and my old pictures.

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Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.

Saint David's Day

So, in my Teaching Writing class, we have a challenge to blog everyday the month of March…I guess its our version of March Madness. But, I guess I was having too much fun being Welsh and drowning in leek soup yesterday to blog. So, today you will get a double dose–a post about yesterday and then later, a post about today to make up for it.
Yesterday, March 1st was Saint David’s Day.
Dafydd (David) is the patron saint of Wales.
Its pretty much the equivalent of St. Patrick’s Day (and he is Welsh too! But that is a post for another day). It is a huge day of celebration for Welsh.
And, besides beer, which I don’t drink, nor is allowed on campus, Welsh celebrate with leek soup!
It sounds disgusting, but it is actually really, really delicious! And, the Welsh professor, Tom Taylor and his wife always make leek soup.
The reason they are holding leeks up to their lapel is because in medieval times, the Welsh would pin leeks to their lapels during battles to tell themselves apart from their enemies. However, as you can see, leeks are huge and stinky. So sometime or another, they switched to daffodils. Which, in Welsh is pretty close to leek, anyway.
Leek=cennin
Daffodil=cenhinen Bedr

So, yesterday, I wore my Welsh dragon earrings, my Welsh flag tshirt, and a felt leek on my shirt.
Hapus Dydd Sant Dafydd! Cymru am byth!!!

Tayler is a work at home mom. She does free lance articles and dabbles in graphic design and virtual assisting for bloggers. She spent 3 years as a history and English teacher. Her passions are her husband, two children, history, reading, nature, and her Savior, Jesus Christ.